Wednesday, September 17, 2014

September 17


You wrote your Unit 1 Final Exam today in class. You will get the results back tomorrow for this test. We'll be moving on to Unit 2 material tomorrow.



Most of today's class was spent doing research for your Thirteen Colonies presentation. These presentations will take place on Tuesday (23rd) and Wednesday (24th) of next week. I also want to remind you that since we have a short week (no school Friday) we'll be dealing with our current issue tomorrow: American foreign policy response to ISIS. Please find/collect sources (newspaper clippings, web articles, political cartoons, photographs, etc.) and bring them to class tomorrow.

Tuesday, September 16, 2014

September 16


You wrote your Unit 1 WRA II Essay today. You had the entire period to complete it, and hopefully I'll be reading some quality essays. Your Unit 1 Final Exam is tomorrow, please see the study guide below. I also recommend going through the Unit 1 Review Prezi, you can find this prezi at the bottom of the Unit 1 page on the wiki.




The Unit 1 Final is a 55 question multiple choice test. It will be written on Wednesday, September 17th. Make sure that you study the following:
  • Chapter 1 and 2 Key Terms (please see the Chapter 1-2 Test Study Guide for a list of terms
  • Study the Ideology Notes (Black Gold School District PDF file, on the Social 30-1 wiki, and in your study booklets, pages 12-17)
  • Review Hobbes, Locke and Rousseau (view of the nature of human beings, how society should be organized, people's role in society; notes on page 3 of your study booklet)
  • Study the 19th Century Political Spectrum
  • Study the 20th Century Political spectrum
  • Study the political-economic grid
  • Know the values and ideas associated with the various ideologies (on the 19th century and 20th century spectrums)
  • Study the Individualism and Collectivism booklet that is in your study booklets (pages 4-7)
  • you need to be able to apply your knowledge and understanding of these concepts/ideas
  • there are a lot of source-based questions on this exam! (there are references to Nazi Germany, the USSR)


You watched a video from the U.S. History series called "The Era of Colonization". While you were watching this video, you should have been taking notes on the topics covered. If you missed today's class, you need to get these notes from a classmate. I also wen through some mnemonic devices to remember the Thirteen Colonies: Never Make Cynthia Run (New England colonies), New Pennies New Dimes (Mid-Atlantic or Middle colonies), My Vehicle Needs Some Gas (Southern colonies). I also assigned you duotangs with some supplementary material from the textbook The United States and Its People. The pages in the duotang cover the colonial period of American history. I also assigned you a colony to research for your Thirteen Colonies presentations. Please come to Room 111 tomorrow, and we'll go down to the Library together to start the research on your assigned colony. Please make sure that you acquaint yourself with the information that students need to take down to complete their charts.
This is a short week (it's a system-wide PD day on Friday), so we're going to revisit our current issues topic on Thursday, namely the U.S. foreign policy response to ISIS. Please look for news articles, political cartoons on the topic. For example, I found the following cartoon:




Monday, September 15, 2014

September 15


Today's class was spent preparing for tomorrow's essay. For those of you that missed Friday's class and today's class: it is your responsibility to get ready for the essay. You need the essay question sheet! The essay question sheet is the only piece of notes that you're allowed to have with you in the computer labs as you write the essay. If you still don't this essay question sheet, you need to send me an e-mail requesting the essay question sheet. I will send it to you. I will also post the essay question sheets on the wiki under WRA II Essays. You are only allowed to handwrite notes on the front side of the essay question sheet under the dotted line. Please go directly to the Blenheim Room tomorrow. Don't forget that you have your Unit 1 Final Exam on Wednesday, please see the study guide here.



I finished off the "Colonization of the Americas" PowerPoint presentation today that I started on Thursday. Your "Seeds of Change" assignment is due tomorrow. We'll be looking at the colonization of the Thirteen Colonies for the next few days, including a research project and presentation on the topic.

Friday, September 12, 2014

September 12


You wrote your Chapter 1-2 Test today, you should get the results back on Monday. Speaking of Monday, we're moving the Unit 1 Final Exam to Wednesday. The Unit 1 WRA II Essay is still on Tuesday, September 16th. In Monday's class we'll go through detailed essay preparation for the Unit 1 WRA II Essay. I do recommend that you check out the sample essays on the Social 30-1 wiki under WRA II Essays. I'll try to add some more sample essays tonight. I think you should finish watching "Sicko" too (you find this on the wiki under Unit 1). I also think that you should check out the PBS documentary "Sick Around the World" which compares healthcare systems. The companion website also contains a lot of valuable information too, so I would poke around the website. Please check out the Unit 1 Final Exam study guide below.



The Unit 1 Final is a 55 question multiple choice test. It will be written on Wednesday, September 17th. Make sure that you study the following:
  • Chapter 1 and 2 Key Terms (please see the Chapter 1-2 Test Study Guide for a list of terms
  • Study the Ideology Notes (Black Gold School District PDF file, on the Social 30-1 wiki, and in your study booklets, pages 12-17)
  • Review Hobbes, Locke and Rousseau (view of the nature of human beings, how society should be organized, people's role in society; notes on page 3 of your study booklet)
  • Study the 19th Century Political Spectrum
  • Study the 20th Century Political spectrum
  • Study the political-economic grid
  • Know the values and ideas associated with the various ideologies (on the 19th century and 20th century spectrums)
  • Study the Individualism and Collectivism booklet that is in your study booklets (pages 4-7)
  • you need to be able to apply your knowledge and understanding of these concepts/ideas
  • there are a lot of source-based questions on this exam! (there are references to Nazi Germany, the USSR)


Today we focused in a current issue that we'll be examining over the course of the next month. I had you read an Associated Press summary article on ISIS, and the American response to this threat in Syria and Iraq. I also showed you a couple of videos, one from the Wall Street Journal and one from BBC News.


We also split into small groups to do some analysis of editorial cartoons as well. I gave you a sheet to help you track the developments of this issue for the next month. One thing that I didn't get a chance to cover was very recent developments on this issue, namely the Obama administration's announcement that they would be entering into a major counter-terrorism campaign against ISIS. Please check out the speech highlights from the CBC News website (you'll find the video on the left-hand side of the page). Please remember that the "Seeds of Change" assignment is due on Tuesday, September 16th.

Thursday, September 11, 2014

September 11


We continued watching "Sicko" today. Unfortunately, we were unable to finish the film. I'm going to post part of the film here on the blog too. I have posted the entire film on the wiki (it's broken into four parts from YouTube) under Unit 1. I did a homework check on your Chapter 2 Key Terms and Questions today as well. Please remember that your Chapter 1-2 Test is tomorrow. Please see the study guide below. Your Unit 1 Final is on Monday, please see the study guide here.







The Chapter 1-2 Test is on Friday, September 12th. It is a mixed format test, it will have a matching section and a short/long answer section. Here is what you should review/study for this test:
    Chapter 1 and 2 Key Terms/Concepts:

    • ideology
    • Thomas Hobbes
    • John Locke
    • Jean-Jacques Rousseau
    • representative democracy
    • individualism
    • collectivism
    • private property
    • public property
    • ideology
    • radical
    • liberal
    • moderate
    • conservative
    • reactionary
    • communism
    • socialism
    • liberalism
    • conservatism
    • fascism
    • adherence to collective norms
    • economic freedom
    • economic equality
    • rule of law
    • competition
    • individual rights and freedoms
    • cooperation
    • self-interest
    • Adam Smith
    Other Study Tips:
    • you must know the 19th century political spectrum and the 20th century political spectrum
    • know similarities and differences between communism and fascism
    • what are the differences between communism and socialism
    • be able to label political and economic spectrums and the values associated with these ideologies
    • be able to label the political-economic grid and know examples of the ideologies in the quadrants (study the Ideology Notes and the notes I gave you in class)
    • know the differences between individualism and collectivism, be able to apply your understanding of these concepts
    • know the key ideas associated with Hobbes, Locke and Rousseau (for example, view of the nature of human beings, etc.)




    We finished watching the PBS documentary today called "When Worlds Collide" today. We started watching the PBS documentary "When Worlds Collide". I also started a PowerPoint lecture on "The European Colonization of the Americas" which I will get back to next week. Tomorrow, we'll be exploring current issues in greater detail.

    Please remember that your "Seeds of Change" assignment where you will have to investigate an Enlightenment era philosopher. As I said in class today, I was thinking about rock stars, movie stars and athletes today and wondering why Enlightenment thinkers aren't as well known as some of them. After all, some of these Enlightenment thinkers have made greater contributions to society, yet they don't enjoy the fame and notoriety as some these entertainment and sports celebrities. We're going to change that. I gave you some ideas in which direction this creative project could go (trading cards, magazine cover stories, Prezis, infographics, website--I changed my mind, what can I say?), show me how creative you are! Just make sure that you present the information in a concise, fun, informative way, and that your project meets all of the requirements, which are as follows:
    • Biographical Information (3 marks)
    • Area(s) of Work (what fields did they work in?) (2 marks)
    • Ideas Introduced (2 marks)
    • Aspect of medieval society that they challenged (2 marks)
    • Were they influential in their own time? (5 marks)
    • What were their contributions to modern society? (3 marks)
    • Mechanics, spelling, grammar, and list of sources cited using a recognized citation system (APA, MLA, Chicago) (3 marks)
    The "Seeds of Change" assignment is due on Tuesday, September 16th.